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World Cafe-Integrative Mental Health

I am a privileged guest at the Academy of Integrative Medicine – Netherlands the week of April 2.  On Tuesday, April 4, we are hosting a World Cafe on Integrative Mental Health (IMH) and the New Mental Health, which will be available by webinar. Dean Don Moss will be introducing  the first panel on the components of IMH.

I realize the time difference might be prohibitive for many, but this Cafe is open to all global callers, and I would be delighted if some can join in for part of the time. The full information, including GTM info, is below.

World café:  Integrative medicine and New mental health as ONE

 Tuesday 4 April 2017 – 1300 – 1800 CET / 0700 AM – 1300 PM EDT

at Springhuys, Springweg 7, Utrecht

Participation via Go To Meeting

https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/407243901 (Links to an external site.)

You can also dial in using your phone.

United States (Toll Free): 1 877 309 2073

United States: +1 (646) 749-3129

Access Code: 407-243-901

Intention

To bring together two movements as ONE that share the same vision, but come at it from different histories, so they can continue to work together as ONE and integrate their histories from their shared vision.

 

Workform

  • A fusion between panel discussions and a world café (Links to an external site.)
  • Each round roughly composed as: 15 minutes introduction, 10 minutes of panel discussion, 20 minutes of world café dialogue between all participants, 5 minutes of harvesting the outcomes of the dialogues, and a short break to switch tables and stretch legs.
  • Four rounds: introduction, the US perspective, the NL perspective, coming together as ONE.

Rounds of Conversation by these topics (times in CET)

  • 1400 CT/0800 EDT: Intro-Dr Don Moss-What is integrated, integrative mental health (IMH):  global perspective
  • 1500/0900 EDT: Intro-Philippe Delespaul (Links to an external site.) -How are organizations coalescing in the NL to support IMH development
  • 1600/1000 EDT: Intro-Michael Milo (Links to an external site.)-A question about the implications for a paradigm shift to a more embodied wellness
  • 1700: Sergej-Open Reflection-What are the patient/client’s perspectives

Participants

  • Introductions by:

Panelists in addition to the introducers:

  • Frans Kusse
  • Robert Geelen
  • Lonneke Reuser
  • Kazuma Matoba

Hope you can join;

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In/Divisible: Political theater for mind-changing

I was just in  Portland, OR, specifically to see a play that my daughter stage managed at Reed College.  The play, called In/Divisible is on Reed’s website at http://events.reed.edu/posts/2015-16/reed-theatre-indivisible.html
It was the faculty directed (and conceived) spring offering, and constructed by the players and
production staff in collaboration with the director.  It was interactive and political and centered
around an issue that is highly charged, but not clearly split down party lines.  The play, set in 4 “movements”, presents the content and background about Charlie Rangel’s congressional
bill on youth mandatory service (the bill that he has proposed every congress for about 12 years).  
The players present actual information about the bill, a brief history of the US military, public
attitude and spending. And they mix up the factoids with vignettes that dramatize how young people can opt to enlist, how the public reacts to veterans, and what people think and feel about 
voluntary service.  Then after each movement, the audience (who is divided into Caucus groups)
debates among themselves parts of the bill, proposes amendments, argues positions with the entire audience and at the end votes for the bill.
 
I am excited about this play, because it reminds me of the power of theater.  I went to two performances, and each night witnessed how people’s minds could (or would not) change on an issue. The people in my group said they noticed how the process was about more than just Rangel’s bill, but demonstrated possibilities in our democracy, and touched on what is going on right now in the national election front.  I know my mind-changed, back and forth several times, not only about yeah/nay on the bill, but the issues that surround it. These include whether youth service of any type should be mandatory, if the draft is a good idea under any circumstances, and the greater issue of US military power at all.
So while I don’t do politics for a living, I do write papers and present them at conferences. So I am composing a paper about interactive theatre as a vehicle for political change.  
 
Specifically, I am intrigued by the reflexive process that occurred in the caucus groups, how it was informed by the presentation of information from the acted movements, and how the interaction of the audience participants reshaped the information into opinion and small group activism.
The paper I envision is about how tenets and processes that are fundamental to phenomenologically applied research apply to democratic political process.  I see specifically the role of reflexivity in the U.S. during the 2016 presidential election year. Spurred on by observing the dynamic of reflexivity in my theatre caucus group, the paper will examine the dynamic of reflexive exchange in political discourse.
Reflexivity involves self-referential processes but is more complex than a reflective stance. Although reflexivity can involve elements of explicit thoughtfulness, it also involves automatic, nonconscious responses.  Reflexivity is both interactive and progressive, involving the setting and the players who subsequently and dynamically recreate their understanding through the reflexive process.
Thus what I saw happen in the 2.5 hrs of interactive theatre is playing out throughout the US around this election year.  The candidates and certainly the media must know that in reflexive recreation sits the opportunity for participants to change their opinions and attitudes.   I am refreshed at the possibilities that minds can yet be changed, even when topics are politically charged.  It warrants further exploration.

 

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Empowerment versus Power

I am honored to co-lead a woman’s spirituality group at my wonderful church on Sanibel Island, St. Michaels and All Angels.  We gather semi-monthly for an hour, and share thoughts, perspectives, and our life experience around various themes that surface organically from our conversations.  We started with a collection of ideas to discuss, and we distributed them around an integral theory model with the four quadrant representing Self, Family, Community and the World.  But some themes are over-arching and touch on all four corners of our lived experience.

Such is the case with our current focus on personal power. This concept has been the subject of recent writings, scholarship and politicizing. We have fueled our discussions with publications that I locate on the internet.  We are find it rich terrain for discussion and growth.  Some of the questions that surface are life questions; I think this is the case of the question of how is empowerment different or the same as having power.

It is complex the ideas of empowerment and personal power, embedded in our cultural and personal experience. But one worth asking each day on the path to self-actualization and perhaps happiness.   From our last readings, I latched onto three questions/perspectives:  how we enjoy (or relinquish) our personal power, what our religious tradition says about a woman’s power, and how contemporary events and situations influence each of us  personally.

I welcome further conversation here, and include the references to readings we are engaging.

 
 
Here are the readings related to personal power:
Ten ways to own your power
Henna Inam (2011)
 
What the Bible says – and does not say- about Women
David Lose (2012)
President, The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia
 
Rwanda is beating the United States in gender equality
Danielle Paquette (2015, Nov. 20)
 
 
All the Single Ladies
Rebecca Traister (2016)
Author interviewed on NPR
 
NY Times book review (by Gillian White)
 

 

 

 

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Integrative Wellness

Saybrook University, where my work finds fruition, now offers public webinar on topics related to holistic wellness.  I am pleased at the impact my colleagues and students are making in the practice realm every day.

Nutrition Webinar Now Available Online: Fit vs. Frail: Nutrition and Exercise for Maintaining Strength, Function, and Independence While Aging

Jeannemarie Beiseigel, PhD, RD, LD, CSSD

Jeannemarie Beiseigel, PhD, RD, LD, CSSD

Saybrook University’s College of Integrative Medicine and Health Sciences presented a webinar on Wednesday evening February 10.  The speaker was Dr. Jeannemarie Beiseigel, the Director of the Master’s of Science Degree in Integrative and Functional Nutrition.  The Webinar is now available online at:    https://youtu.be/quU24IpxBpc 

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A blog to visit

Luann Fortune, LMT, PhD

To my phenomenology, somatic, and embodied thinking friends, consider visiting the new blog site of my friend, colleague and mentor: Dr. Valerie Bentz:
http://valeriebentz.com/blog/

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A blog to visit

To my phenomenology, somatic, and embodied thinking friends, consider visiting the new blog site of my friend, colleague and mentor: Dr. Valerie Bentz:
http://valeriebentz.com/blog/

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Discussions on somatic education

Source: Discussions on somatic education

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